Inspired by clouds

Take your time.

I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It runs about $1300. It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms. The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger.

When it dies, swap them all.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.

Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky.

— Rabindranath Tagore

Breathe the world.

I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It runs about $1300. It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms. The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger. When it dies, swap them all.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.

Heavy hearts, like heavy clouds in the sky, are best relieved by the letting of a little water.

— Christopher Morley

Enjoy the morning.

The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger. When it dies, swap them all.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever. I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It runs about $1300.

It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms.

There are no rules of architecture for a castle in the clouds and this is real.

— Gilbert K. Chesterton

Free your mind.

The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger. When it dies, swap them all.

I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It runs about $1300. It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.

Photography is better shared.


Lideta Market by Vilalta Arquitectura

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Source: Curbed

"an imposing, ethereal, jewel box"

In a city where glass cladded buildings are springing at every corner, it is so refreshing to see this beautiful concrete structure. The design team's research resulted in a building that is responsive to the existing environmental conditions. The perforated shell of the building will allow for much needed ventilation and light, the solar panels and rain water collection will address the city's water and power supply shortages. Hopefully, this will be a start of a new wave of design thinking.

Read more about this building here.

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The 1960s architectural legacy of Addis Ababa.

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Source: Selamta - The Magazine of Ethiopian Airlines

Such a beautifully written article about the building that were built in the 1960's in Addis Ababa. These mid-century buildings are my favorite and have studied them back in school. Their timeless beauty amazes me and I really wish we could find ways of respecting their surroundings and also make efforts of renovating and maintaining them.

In the period that followed over the late 1950s and early 1960s, Addis went through a massive urban makeover that proved extremely prolific architecturally. The all-powerful emperor attracted some well-known international architects to help realize his dream of presenting Addis as the capital of a united Africa. In his memoirs, Italian architect Arturo Mezzedimi — who worked very closely with the emperor for some 23 years — quoted him as saying: “It is necessary to show people that it is possible to construct grand buildings here, too, by erecting a couple of high-profile structures, with the maximum possible use of home-produced material.”

Read the original article

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Six Legendary Architects Design Rugs to Benefit Afghan Women

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Source: Architectural Digest

Ordinary floors are about to get some extraordinary help from a handful of top-tier architects. Frank Gehry, Michael Graves, Zaha Hadid, Robert A.M. Stern, Margaret McCurry, and Stanley Tigerman have designed rugs for Arzu Studio Hope’s new Masters collection. However, Arzu’s mission is about much more than making beautiful carpets—the Chicago-based not-for-profit organization is dedicated to improving the lives of Afghan women weavers and their families, based on a model of social entrepreneurship.

Read the original post.
Inspirations behind the designs.

 

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Beautiful Beyond Words

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I read The Kite Runner back in 2008 and since then I have been in love and very much intrigued by the Afghan history. A Thousand Splendid Suns and The Bookseller of Kabul were subsequently added to my library. I have enjoyed all three books a lot, they are my most favorite books of all time.

Recently, I came across an ad on the newspaper about a concert by ensembles of Afghanistan National Institute of Music and it was to be held at Carnegie Hall right here in New York! The whole thing sounded magical – music from a country I’m smitten over, music from a war-torn country, music from people who suffered for decades and were forbidden to play any sort of music…and at a prestigious venue – this event was not to be missed! A few years ago, this wouldn’t even have been possible.

The performance was beautiful beyond words, it brought tears to my eyes. The whole thing was much more than a musical concert. I see these passionate and skillful youngsters, who make up the ensembles, as the bright hope of a nation yearning for peace and stability. And I hope the rich history and tradition of Afghanistan will come to life through this selfless endeavor.

 

More readings:

Afghanistan National Institute of Music
How do You Get to Carnegie Hall? Start in Kabul.
‘Bolero’ on Instruments Ravel Never Dreamed Of - Afghan Ensembles at Carnegie Hall

 

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How Would You Like Your Graphic Design?

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source: colinharman.com

There are times when things just need to be explained using a spectacular Venn diagram. I made this last night whilst sitting on a screened in porch by an outdoor fireplace when it was late. Design is a funny thing, not as funny as a Kangaroo jumping on a trampoline, but let’s be honest what is as funny as that? I’ll give you a little hint: nothing.

Anyway, I love design, but it has its limitations in the creation process. Hopefully this helps you understand what those are limitations are, and helps you choose how you would like your design work in the future.

Your thoughts?

Prints Now Available: Click here to be taken to the shop

 

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Faces

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In a world of six billion other faces, your face is unique. It reveals your personality, your genetic and cultural identity and it can be read like a book.

Every face contains a million secrets. And whether we like it or not, the face reveals our feelings and what’s really going on deep down inside. The face communicates without saying a word...

- Wikipedia - The Human Face (from a BBC series)

These pictures were taken at a rural village in Southern Ethiopia in 2005 using a Canon 35mm camera.

05-rev

04-rev

Faces of Ethiopia 01

Faces of Ethiopia 02

Faces of Ethiopia 03

Faces of Ethiopia 06

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This is Your Life

How to Find Your Purpose and Do What You Love

by Maria Popova

Source: Brain Pickings

Why prestige is the enemy of passion, or how to master the balance of setting boundaries and making friends.

“Find something more important than you are,” philosopher Dan Dennett once said in discussing the secret of happiness,“and dedicate your life to it.” But how, exactly, do we find that? Surely, it isn’t by luck. I myself am a firm believer in the power of curiosity and choice as the engine of fulfillment, but precisely how you arrive at your true calling is an intricate and highly individual dance of discovery. Still, there are certain factors — certain choices — that make it easier. Gathered here are insights from seven thinkers who have contemplated the art-science of making your life’s calling a living. Read the original post.


Sophie Blackall_Subway Art

What Caught My Eyes...

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Noticed this beautiful work of art on the subway this morning. Such a beautiful representation of the different array of subway riders. Loved it!

The following text excerpt is from Sophie Blackall's Blog
Needless to say I love the subway. I glean all my characters from my fellow passengers. The same sorts of things which attracted me to Missed Connections, I find on the train: subtle interactions, eccentricity, beauty, sorrow, secrets, kindness, generosity, excellent hairdos. Every sort of person imaginable and unimaginable. For this poster, I measured my allotted space very carefully and figured out I had enough space to draw 34 people. I had to whittle and whittle my list of favorite characters. The surfer standing with his board in a puddle of water didn't make it. Neither did the gorgeous elderly drag queen, the man with the enormous orange velour armchair or the disheveled mermaids. I'm sorry. I still love you. Read more here.

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